Tribune Broadcasting / Thinkstock
Tribune Broadcasting / Thinkstock
The Doctors / Thinkstock

US News

US News

Shelly Sterling, wife of former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, in Los Angeles. Shelly Sterling negotiated a landmark deal for $2 billion to sell the Clippers to Steve Ballmer, former CEO of Microsoft. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Shelly Sterling talks about husband, Clippers saleAP Exclusive: Shelly Sterling talks about husband, sale of the Clippers to Steve Ballmer
The Associated Press40 minutes ago
In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014, Greg Groff and his daughter Olivia, of Chicago, walk during a visit at the Miami Seaquarium in Key Biscayne, Fla. They noted the pink scars and disfigured tail on one manatee, damage from a boat propeller that left it unable to survive in the wild. Florida’s manatees need even more stringent protections than their listing on the federal endangered species list, Groff said, adding that boaters should go elsewhere if they don’t like speed limits in waters where manatees swim. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
Manatees may soon lose endangered species statusEnvironmentalists, conservatives battle over whether manatees are 'endangered' or 'threatened'
The Associated Press52 minutes ago
'Walking Dead' Marine battalion to be deactivatedDecorated 'Walking Dead' Marine Corps battalion to be deactivated during ceremony Friday
The Associated Press1 hour ago
In this Aug..21, 2014 photo Jim Corbin, in red shirt, leads volunteers as they search for wild ginseng plants in a forest are near Bryson City, N.C. The legal ginseng hunting season begins Sept. 16, and Corbin and his colleagues are spreading harmless yellow dye on the plant’s roots to discourage poachers. He says dealers are alerted not to buy plants with the dyed roots. But with wild ginseng root fetching upward of $900 a pound, untold numbers of poachers have taken to local forests. (AP Photo/Mitch Weiss)
Feds jail ginseng poacher as wild plants face riskAuthorities crack down on habitual ginseng poacher, as illegal digging threatens wild plants
The Associated Press1 hour ago
This undated handout photo provided by the Agriculture Department shows a seized Giant African Snail. The Giant African Snail eats buildings, destroys crops and can cause meningitis in humans. But some people still want to collect, and even eat, the slimy invaders. The Department of Agriculture is trying to stop them. Since June, USDA has seized more than 1,200 of the large snails, also known as Giant African Land Snails, all of them traced back to one person in Georgia who was illegally selling them.(AP Photo/Agriculture Department)
USDA seizes more than 1,200 illegal giant snailsBeware of giant snails! USDA seizes more than 1,200 African snails that eat buildings, crops
The Associated Press1 hour ago

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