news 1 week ago

Epic Games Store Revises Refund Policy

Variety — Brittany Vincent

The Epic Games Store officially changed its refund policy this week, according to Epic Games’ Director of Publishing Strategy Sergey Galyonkin.

Galyonkin took to Twitter on Friday to announce that the policy had been altered, citing “unlimited refunds within 14 days of purchase and under 2 hours played.”

“The team is working on the self-service solution, but for now, you’ll have to go through player support,” he said. The self-service solution initially caused frustration among players, as it’s a far cry from the simplicity of other platforms’ refund processes, such as Steam’s. Galyonkin also noted that the Epic Games store also now supports 30 different regions to make 130 countries total. There isn’t local pricing support for all countries yet, but that feature is coming.

Originally, purchasing a game and then requesting a refund resulted in players being sent to Epic’s contact form to send a request. Players received a lengthy set of verification requests as a reply to their ticket that requested information like the player’s public IP address, the date they created their Epic Games account, an invoice ID, location where the purchase was made, their account’s display name, the last 4 digits of the card used to purchase the game, the date of their last login, and the names of any of their associated accounts connected to their Epic Games ID.

Epic noted these requests were due to the fact they were “serious about player security” in the forms, and would not issue a refund or make any changes to the account if account verification was not completed. At the time, Epic Games stated that the “manual” review process was only temporary, as Epic’s Tim Sweeney noted during interview with GamesIndustry.biz. He also stated that users would be given “no-questions-asked” refund tokens for use within the first 14 days after purchasing a game.

For now, players wishing to refund a game that falls within the unlimited refunds policy will still have to go through the player support form, but as Galyonkin has stated, the team is currently working on a fix for that. Variety has reached out for more information on the self-service solution, and will update if a response is received.

Recently, the Better Business Bureau foisted an “F” rating on Epic Games’ Cary, North Carolina-based offices due to a lack of responses to customer complaints, many of which were through the Epic Games’ ticketing system.